History Department

Articles From the Triangle

The following articles, published in Hanover College's student newspaper between 1954 and 1976, reflect attitudes on campus at that time.

  • 12 May 1944 - a southerner discusses the "Negro-White race situation"
  • 27 Apr. 1945 - the Student Christian Association holds a panel discussion on race
  • 29 Aug. 1954 - Walter Lafeber discusses communism and alludes to common attitudes about race
  • 18 Nov. 1955 - committees prepare for admitting African-American students
  • 16 Dec. 1955 - announcement of a presentation on "racial problems"
  • 13 Jan. 1961 - Warren Spencer wins a national grant from Pi Gamma Mu
  • 9 Mar. 1962 - student volunteers assist a local AME church
  • 19 Oct. 1962 - J. Milton Yinger speaks on racial mixing and ethnic pride
  • 18 Jan. 1963 - Colby College pushes for integrated fraternities and sororities; a parent responds
  • 20 Mar. 1963 - Val Nash compares caste systems in India and the United States
  • 1 Feb. 1963 - a "Concerned Parent" asserts that social rights and civil rights are different
  • 4 Oct. 1963 - students and faculty organize a committee to investigate discrimination
  • 19 Oct. 1963 - students propose forming a "Committee on Civil Rights"
  • 1 Nov. 1963 - the Student Senate establishes a Civil Rights Committee
  • 8 Nov. 1963 - Judy Moffett investigates homogeneity in the student body
  • 15 Nov. 1963 - Dave Railsback evaluates the "civil rights issue" in national politics
  • 22 Nov. 1963 - the Civil Rights Committee announces that it wishes to avoid the "negative connotations" of civil right protest
  • 6 Dec. 1963 - Judy Moffett investigates homogeneity in the faculty
  • 24 Jan. 1964 - student organizations support the Presbyterian Church's "Emergency Fund for Freedom" to support racial equality
  • 30 Jan. 1964 - a civil rights consultant describes Hanover as "operating within a social vacuum" on the topic of civil rights
  • 3 Apr. 1964 - David Larson predicts future conflict because the fraternities and sororities do not accept African-American members
  • 2 Apr. 1965 - report on Hanover students' participating in the Selma to Montgomery march
  • 2 Apr. 1965 - Judy Helms reports on the "complexities" of race relations in the South
  • 9 Apr. 1965 - a Southerner "resents" the article by Judy Helms
  • 16 Oct. 1965 - Triangle editors ask that assemblies "stimulate interest, teach us something, and make us think"
  • 1 Dec. 1967 - Aaron Wood III describes the "bitter emotions" that lead African-American students to form "Afro-Black groups"
  • 12 Apr. 1968 - Martin Luther King, Jr's assassination shocks the campus: "now we must worry"
  • 12 Apr. 1968 -Theology Professor John B. Matthews asks "what it would cost" to be "brutally honest" about racism at Hanover
  • 12 Apr. 1968 - letter to the editor asks white Americans to examine themselves and accept blame for racist behavior
  • 14 May 1968 - Sarah Howard calls for respect for non-middle-class students and ending discrimination in Greek organizations
  • 15 Nov. 1968 - Public discussion of discrimination in Greek organizations led to "very emotional and personal accusations"
  • 22 Nov. 1968 - Susan McGaw argues that change comes from rational problem solving, not name-calling
  • 22 Nov. 1968 - Beckie Thompson argues that righting discrimination requires spending "vast amounts of public and private money"
  • 16 Dec. 1968 - Julie Field writes "were I... an intelligent black high-school senior, I would find the Hanover campus unappealing"
  • 7 Apr. 1969 - Triangle editors recorded an open conversation among 14 African-American students about the College (part 1)
  • 8 May 1969 - Triangle editors recorded an open conversation among 14 African-American students about the College (part 2)

"Race Situation is Topic of Address," Hanover College Triangle, 12 May 1944, p. 4.

  1. "As One Southerner Sees the Negro-White Race Situation" was the topic discussed by the Reverend A. B. Rhodes at the Hanover College Chapel, Wednesday morning, May 10.
  2. Reared in the south, Mr. Rhodes said that he should be prejudiced but that his relationships with the Negroes have been happy ones. He bases this attitude on the guiding principles valid for all human relationships: the Law of Love, and the Golden Rule; the doctrine of the Fatherhood of God; and the fact that there is only one race -- the human race.
  3. Racism is based on prejudice, not facts, and there is no race purity. There is a major difference within the race as well as between the race groups. Mr. Rhodes suggested that we realize that we had nothing to do with our color -- that this was placed in the hands of our ancestors and God.
  4. He said that the Negro should attempt to place himself in the place of the white psychologically and then see if he himself would practice the Golden Rule.
  5. There are two major race questions today as Mr. Rhodes pointed out. They are the question of discrimination of class equality and the question connected with the peace after the war.
  6. The methods so far used to deal with the problem have proved unsatisfactory: Negroes have associated with and passed for whites.
  7. Some of the wealthier Negroes have merely been complacent.
  8. Some have blamed it all on the whites, and some have suffered with servility, clowning, or resignation.
  9. According to the speaker, we are not to move too fast in our efforts two be rid of this problem, but should let the church take the lead. Right now our duties are pioneering and education. The principles of Jesus must stand.

This article was selected for Learning in Black and White, a study of African Americans at Hanover College from 1832 to 1980.
This is a faithful transcription of the text as it appears in the print version of the Triangle, available at the Hanover College Archives.

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"Race Relations Are Discussed by SCA," Hanover College Triangle, 27 Apr. 1945, p. 4.

  1. Approximately forty members attended the all-membership meeting of the Student Christian Association on Tuesday, April 17, in the Donner Hall dining room. Lucy Gilbert took charge of the program, which she turned over to the race relations panel, conducted by Dr. Swartz.
  2. The panel included Mr. Fred Action, at present working on a municipal housing project for Negroes, Mr. Black, Secretary of the Urban League, Rev. L. W. Bottoms -- all from Louisville, and Mr. Howard L. Wallace, former school teacher in the South, from Hanover.
  3. The panel discussed understanding the Negro, false rumors about riots, the problems during the war, the educational and industrial postwar problems, separate areas of equal opportunity, and natural grouping in society. The panel concluded that human relationship is the real problem. Mr. Bottoms said, "A good life is not money or power but a spirit of freedom that will eliminate conflict."
  4. At present there are two groups working to get action; they are the pressure group. The Fair Employment Policy is an example of the pressure idea. There is room for both groups methods.
  5. After the discussion, which lasted an hour, students talked informally with the panel speakers.

This article was selected for Learning in Black and White, a study of African Americans at Hanover College from 1832 to 1980.
This is a faithful transcription of the text as it appears in the print version of the Triangle, available at the Hanover College Archives.

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Walt Lafeber, "What the English Think of Communism," Hanover College Triangle, 29 Aug. 1954, p. 2.

  1. An American tourist or student who is traveling in a foreign country is often left almost senseless after some startling revelation about a thing which this misplaced American perhaps never thought of before.
  2. The closest I came to this state of consciousness (or unconsciousness, you might call it), was one summer evening when a young and brilliant English student named Steve Williamson came into my room, and we began talking about American politics. The course of the conversation turned to Communism and Steve let loose with a verbal blast at the United States. He said, "I believe that if the United States ever goes through a depression as serious as that depression of 1929, the United States will then go Communistic."
  3. I seriously thought I hadn't heard right. This was even more startling than the time the old Negro asked me what I would do if I was judged by a Negro Almighty God before I could enter the Gates of Heaven. I was speechless that time too, needless to say. Steve and I got into quite an argument. Steve based his argument on the fact that we in America have no real left-wing political party to absorb the many radicals who would, no doubt, arise out of such economic chaos. I told him of the Democratic Party which, while not socialistic by a long way, fulfilled many of the ideas and aspirations of some of the more leftist members of the American community. Steve got the point.
  4. But it is interesting that such a thought could ever enter the head of an English boy who possessed one of the finest minds in the political field I encountered all summer. It is also interesting to note that the British are not worried about Communism. Much can be said of this.
  5. Britain has had several bad "red scares." The first was over the leakage of atomic bomb secrets, the second over a communist government taking control in British Guiana. In the latter case, the English moved in with force and put the colony under military rule for a time. Many British are still criticizing this move. They do not believe that rule by force destroys Communist infiltration or ideals.
  6. One English man defined the British Communists as "A group of fools who have been led astray." The English had fought the Russian menace with tradition, ideas, and education in past years and evidently have now won. They have not had to revert to outlawing political ideas. Perhaps this is impossible in America, but we must admit that Britain has made it work. The English Communist can say anything he likes in Britain, but he hasn't gotten very far and probably won't.
  7. A prominent member of the British Labour Party, R. H. M. Crossman told us in an informal group, that statistics show that approximately 25% of the British Communist Party leave the Party ranks every year. They leave on their own will, "seeing the light" as it were. The British do not believe in giving these "Pinks" anything to fight for or argue about. They just leave them alone and they cause little or no trouble.
  8. I mentioned before that the English do not believe that Communism can be destroyed by force. We could jokingly say that small Great Britain doesn't have the force to do the job anyway, so they don't have a lot of choice. But to many people their attitude makes some sense. We could bomb Russia off the map, but there will still be Communists who are so indoctrinated that they could start the Party and the ideal all over again. But kill the idea, educate the people to know better, get the head out of the sand and face the facts on Communism (many of which aren't so bad as at face value), and Marxism dies a natural death.
  9. This is the English point of view. It's interesting to think about.

This article was selected for Learning in Black and White, a study of African Americans at Hanover College from 1832 to 1980.
This is a faithful transcription of the text as it appears in the print version of the Triangle, available at the Hanover College Archives.

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